YOU MIGHT BE A LIBERTARIAN


(Apologies to Jeff Foxworthy)

Do you think that it makes more sense to let a free market, in which competition among participants is the chief characteristic, offer everything from what we eat to the medical care we get, instead of government-mandated programs designed by anonymous bureaucrats that limit our choices based on the whims of politicians? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you think the government should stop spending substantive amounts of money maintaining military bases in countries from Britain to Korea, and station all the troops at home, creating more money flow and jobs in the United States? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you think the government should stop interfering in the affairs of other sovereign countries and instead offer to trade and deal equally with all nations? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you think that the government should stop its expensive and unsuccessful war on drugs, legalize and regulate currently illegal drugs, and allow states to spend what would have been drug-war money on programs that help drug abusers? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you think that it’s not the government’s business to define marriage and regulate who can marry, but that states should issue civil union permits to all who wish to enter legal partnerships, and that what constitutes marriage and who should marry is up to individuals and their religious institutions? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you think that government should not decide who should be born and who should die? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you believe that the federal government engages in activities beyond constitutional limitations, and that therefore taxation to pay for those activities is illegal and unconstitutional? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you believe that the federal government’s continued borrowing and printing money to support programs that are both unconstitutional and beyond our means should be wound-down over time, and that Congress must make provision to eliminate the federal debt over time? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you think that the preservation of individual rights and liberty for all Americans is more important than the threat of terrorist acts? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you think that federal, state and local government pervasive surveillance programs are both intrusive and unconstitutional? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you believe that Americans have an obligation to provide assistance to those who really need it, but that providing a government-financed living to those who choose not to be productive is neither a legitimate role of government nor within our financial means? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you think that the rights and freedoms of Americans guaranteed in the Constitution cannot be maintained if the constitutional limits on government are ignored? Then you might be a libertarian.

Do you understand and disagree with the policies and actions of both Democrats and Republicans, and wish there were another choice? Then you might be a libertarian.

Learn more about libertarianism and decide for yourself if it’s a better choice for you and for America. And ask yourself if a Democrat or Republican would tell you to decide for yourself.

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